Education at Crazy Horse

Education

Crazy Horse Memorial has always had an educational mission.

Chief Henry Standing Bear was a strong, proud and progressive leader who believed that education was instrumental in preserving the culture and living heritage of the American Indian peoples. He was an eloquent writer and learned at an early age that he would be able to advance his ideals much more effectively using the mighty pen. This is evidenced in his invitation to sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski in which Standing Bear communicated that he and his fellow chiefs wanted the world to know that "the Red Man has great heroes also." Once Korczak accepted Standing Bear's invitation he ensured education was an essential part of the mission at Crazy Horse Memorial. The dream that started with Standing Bear's desire was the genesis of what has become an incredible vision and story that remains in a state of becoming.

As with any great dream, Crazy Horse Memorial's education efforts started small. In 1978 the Crazy Horse Memorial scholarship program began with a single college  scholarship of $250. Korczak called it a "modest effort now toward the future, long-range educational goals of Crazy Horse." Today the cumulative total awarded to American Indian students attending colleges or universities in South Dakota exceeds $2 million. Eligible applicants must be: American Indian students who plan to attend, or are attending a South Dakota college, university, vocational-technical school or tribal college. Crazy Horse Memorial does not process scholarship applications and is not involved in the selection process. Funds are distributed to qualifying colleges, universities and technical institutions and recipients are selected by the institutions of higher education. Interested students should contact the financial aid office at their college.

The educational efforts of the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation were furthered in 2010 with the creation of the INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® . The university summer program, offered in partnership with the University of South Dakota, serves to advance the educational goals of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation by offering accepted students a full semester of college and paid internships at the Memorial. Upon successful completion of the summer program; students will leave the instructional and residential facility at Crazy Horse with up to 12 transferable college credits. In the first six years of its history, 160 students and 26 tribes in 16 states have successfully completed the program. Of the students who have successfully completed the program and matriculated to a variety of colleges and universities around the country, 86% have been American Indian. Worth noting is that the national persistence rate for American Indians enrolled in college lingers around 15%, while annual tracking of the persistence of successful completers of the Summer Program in the first six years reveals an overall college persistence rate of 64% for all students and 59% in particular, for American Indian students. To date, several students who started their college studies at Crazy Horse have earned their college degrees.

Click here to learn more about the educational efforts at Crazy Horse Memorial.
  • “No one is ever wrong who desires to do that which is not required of them to do — and that which is of a noble purpose. The purpose of Crazy Horse is noble.”
     
    Korczak Ziolkowski / Sculptor
  • “My fellow chiefs and I would like the white man to know that the red man has great heroes also.”
     
    Chief Henry Standing Bear
  • “When the legends die, the dreams end. When the dreams end, there is no more greatness.”
     
    Korczak Ziolkowski / Sculptor
  • “The Important thing is that we never stop. That’s the main thing. And if you looked at it as strictly a view of being finished, you could get awfully distracted waiting for that day to come. This way, you’re pleased with every little step of progress that you make.”
     
    Ruth Ziolkowski / Sculptor's Wife
  • “One does not sell the earth upon which the people walk.”
     
    Crazy Horse
  • “By carving Crazy Horse, if I can give back to the Indian some of his pride and create a means to keep alive his culture and heritage, my life will have been worthwile.”
     
    Korczak Ziolkowski / Sculptor
  • “He left everything so we can carry on his work, and that’s just what we’re going to do. We’re dedicated to that. His whole life would be wasted if the mountain carving and the humanitarian goals are not completed.”
     
    Ruth Ziolkowski / Sculptor's Wife
  • “My lands are where my dead lie buried.”
     
    Crazy Horse
  • “If it weren’t for each and every one you, whether your gift was small or large monetarily, whether it was friendship and encouragement, without you we wouldn’t be here…”
     
    Ruth Ziolkowski / Sculptor's Wife
  • “Standing Bear explained that the Indian has a concept of honoring their great heroes that’s totally different from the white man’s. It was difficult for me to understand at first…The Indian uses the direct approach. He says: that man was my ancestor, and he was a great man, so we should honor him-I would not lie or cheat because I am his blood”
     
    Korczak Ziolkowski / Sculptor

Crazy Horse Memorial
12151 Avenue of the Chiefs
Crazy Horse, SD 57730-8900

(605) 673-4681

Email: memorial@crazyhorse.org

Upcoming Events

  • Memorial Weekend
    May 26-29
    2017

    Memorial Weekend <br />May 26-29,<br /> 2017
    Native American’s across this great nation have served and sacrificed in the United States Military, join us to honor all fallen heroes who fought and protected our freedom. American Indian artists will be featured throughout the Welcome Center. Admission to the Memorial will be waived with 3 cans of food per person.
  • Legends in Light
    May 26-Oct 1
    2017

    Legends in Light<br /> May 26-Oct 1<br />
    This spectacular light show tells the story of the Memorial in laser lights projected onto the Mountain. You will be treated to the story of Chief Henry Standing Bear’s invitation to Korczak, Ruth’s contributions and special features of many Native American heroes. This must see show is featured nightly at dark, for sun down times click here: http://www.calendar-updates.com/sun.asp
  • Native Americans’Day
    Oct 9
    2017

    Native Americans’ Day  Oct 10, 2016
    Governor George S. Mickelson and the SD legislature declared 1990 as the “Year of Reconciliation”, the day formerly known as Columbus Day became Native American Day. Native American Day at Crazy Horse Memorial is celebrated by planned activities for kids, program and performers, Educator of the Year is awarded and (weather permitting) a mountain blast. Admission is waved to the Memorial with 3 cans of food per person.